Angles & Dangles**

I swear this actually happened
From Yahoo

Angles & Dangles**

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:29 pm

From: "Kyle" <pingjockey627@...>
Date: Thu Sep 30, 2004 4:25 pm
Subject: Angles & Dangles

Hi Shipmates,

Recently, the Discovery Channel ran a BOOMER special and they showed
one of the Ohio boats going through angles and dangles. The crew
were having akin to soap box derbies with odds and ends the could
construct into a rolling car or object.

Thought it was somewhat interesting, but also a little out of sorts
for the 'safety concious' (like the true Submariner is supposed to
exemplify).

What were some things that happened during Angles and Dangles on the
USS James Madison? During one particular angle drill, I remember
loud crashes from the vacinity of the galley followed by loud
cursing and swearing.

Any sea stories from the MADISON regarding 'Angles & Dangles'?

Gone ashore for a bit,

Kyle L.

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:31 pm

From: John <jn_av8r@...>
Date: Thu Sep 30, 2004 6:50 pm
Subject: Re: [USS_James_Madison_SSBN627] Angles & Dangles

The XO of the Blue Crew (82 - 86 -or so-) LCDR. Larry
Papineau (a truly awesome XO for sure, who made
skipper of another boomer there at Group 6) had no
tolerance for the ship not being properly stowed for
sea!!! Well, not too terribly far along into the
patrol, I was surprisingly awaken in my rack with my
feet WELL ABOVE the level of my head... Needless to
say this unannounced angle got my attention, but not
nearly as quickly as the poor galley people who were
soon sweeping up 95% of every dish, plate, cup, etc.
that wasn't actually in the dish/cup racks! Later
that day after handing out the PoD, there was a nice
little reminder from the XO about the importance and
SAFETY of being properly stowed for sea!! You have
to admire an XO who will walk into the Control Room
and tell the Officer of the Deck, "Give me a 20/25
deg. down angle now" to make point for all hands to
truly realize.

SUB-VETS FOR PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH!!

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:33 pm

From: James.Eldridge@...
Date: Thu Sep 30, 2004 11:26 pm
Subject: Re: [USS_James_Madison_SSBN627] Angles & Dangles

I remember that the MTs would secure a strand of marlin across the missile compartment. It would sag as we went down. When we would get to test depth, they cinched it up and look to see when it would part on the way up. It certainly was more "silent" than car racing unless they insulated the wheels.
Another thing was the paint the Cheng had hidden for the pre-return spiff-up. It was always vulnerable to Angles & Dangles.
The Type 11 periscope runs during the winter patrols was always a good test of properly stowed gear. Med runs were easier in that respect.

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:35 pm

From: <janses01@...>
Date: Fri Oct 1, 2004 8:43 am
Subject: Re: [USS_James_Madison_SSBN627] Angles & Dangles

Not an "Angle & Dangle" story but in about 71 those of us on the Gold side would put ball bearing balls in the manuvering hand rail just before change of command ( this was a big deal because the rail was sprund and come alongs etc were involved in getting it back up) so when she rolled for the Blue Crew so would the bearings.
Or how about the RPCP siren hidden in the ward room with a battery lantern relay on a battery. Battery dies, relay closes, siren goes off.
Really pissed the Blue crew CO (Herr Shindler?) off as I remember.
Then there was the Paint the RPFW piping in the tunnel for the Gold and unpaint same for the Blue deal but that is another story.
Skip

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:36 pm

From: "Adams, Ken P" <ken_adams@...>
Date: Fri Oct 1, 2004 9:49 am
Subject: RE: [USS_James_Madison_SSBN627] Angles & Dangles

Yes. Navigation passes in the Norwegian Sea were like riding a roller
coaster. When the suction on the missle deck pulled us into a broach,
the sail planes would jar the boat port and starboard as they pounded
against the waves.

Ken Adams (MM2)
Gold 72-78

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:37 pm

From: Ed Kelleher <Pres@...>
Date: Fri Oct 1, 2004 9:59 am
Subject: RE: [USS_James_Madison_SSBN627] Angles & Dangles

Broached? Oh, Goldies.

:-)

Always sort of a race:

<Conn, Nav losing signal on the floating wire ...>
<Conn, Radio losing signal on the floating wire ...>


Ed (EJ) Kelleher
ETN2 (SS) SSBN627B 1972-1976
Columbia, SC

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:41 pm

From: "Stokes, Vincent" <stokesv@...>
Date: Fri Oct 1, 2004 11:24 am
Subject: RE: [USS_James_Madison_SSBN627] Digest Number 248

I was Blue Crew Supply Officer from 82 to 85 - a few angles and dangles
come to mind:

I think it was patrol 53 or 55 when we did As and Ds while we headed out
to patrol. Having just finished food load out after refit, I was still
missing a few #10 cans of mixed nuts....funny how they all don't make it
into the food lockers when you had to bring food on board one can at a
time. Well, I was on the dive when we got the 25 down call, and sure
enough, here comes one of the #10 cans of mixed nuts flying out of the
overhead from the ESM bay. NavETs were on the XOs you-know-what list
after that for a few days....and my inventory got a little bit better!

My other memory is also of (then) XO Papineau during the patrol 59's
TRE. XO was in Ops Middle Level P-way when we started doing As and Ds
(of course, being set up for a stern planes jam dive). Again, I was on
the dive (sweating and swearing and generally sphinctering because I had
overheard that the jam dive was going to be on the third A and D), so
since it was an unannounced A and D, we took about a 15 - 20 degree down angle, and the XO loses his footing and slid all the way down Ops ML to the torpedo room hatch. Fortunately, only thing injured was a bit o'
pride... :-)

Sorry I didn't make the reunion, will do my best to make the next one.
Have lots of pics and memorabilia from Patrols 51, 53, 55, 57 and 59.

By the way, does anyone remember the story about the one-armed monkey with the switchblade that the COB gave before we headed into Halifax Nova Scotia during Patrol 55?

Best regards to all of you!

Vince Stokes
Logistics Project Officer, Battelle Memorial Institiute
USNR Single Site Storage Facility
Fort Worth Federal Center
501 W. Felix, Warehouse 3-2
Fort Worth, TX 76115

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:46 pm

Moderator note: The following are several other threads combined here for clarity and continuity.

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:47 pm

From: "Bryant, Donald (TEM)" <dbryant@...>
Date: Fri Oct 1, 2004 12:34 pm
Subject: RE: [USS_James_Madison_SSBN627] Digest Number 248

I remember stores load well being the fine sonarman that I was we used to make
sure we could get stationed by the sonar door so we could get the first choice
of the cans of mixed nuts or cashews before the radiomen got them. there was
always a fight between sonar and radio to get the station at ladder from upper
level to lower level op's I'm surprised that any thing made it to the galley .

oh yeah the canned peaches to.
Donald Bryant STS3 77-79

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:47 pm

From: "wagnomaster" <wagnomaster@...>
Date: Tue Oct 5, 2004 11:47 am
Subject: Re: Digest Number 248

I think this was a tradition since commissioning. I can remember
doing the same thing in 1970 to 1972. Radioman usually won out on
the top of the upper level ladder when I was there. A good
interception point was the escape trunk. With an RM in the escape
trunk and one in upper level ops by the radio room door, we got our
fair share.

F Thornal RMC(SS) Ret.

From Yahoo

Nuts and stow for sea**

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:48 pm

From: "gradyh627" <gharrison@...>
Date: Fri Oct 1, 2004 5:18 pm
Subject: Nuts and stow for sea


I hadn't been on board for a couple of weeks when the Supply Master
Chief ran out of pecans for pecan pies and used salted mixed nuts as
a substitue (a can the bluies left behind?). XO Ellis went bezerk
when seeing the pie on the wardroom table and took it to the Chop
(Rick Gross)'s stateroom 1 yelling "Chop what's this shit?" and
threw it at the chop's face (direct hit). I knew from that day on
that it wasn't a good idea to substitute salted mixed nuts for
pecans but the opportunity hasn't presented itself in the last 20
years, but it is another useless lesson learned just in case...
Someone might refresh my memory with the name of a storekeeper we
nicknamed penguin due to an uncanny resemblance with the flightless
bird. He stowed a bunch of ventilation filters above maneuvering
when we were in port (not steaming) and tied then to linkage of the
stern throttles with rope. We didn't notice anything wrong warming
up the main engines, but when we needed a real astern bell, the
throttles jammed... Engine room upper level saved the day by taking
local control of the engines and manning the JA phones. A few hours
later, ENG had penguin crawl up above maneuvering and remove every
one of those filters or be shot on the spot, except this time we
were steaming and penguin kept burning himself on poorly insulated
steam pipes and cussing up a storm...

From Yahoo

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:49 pm

From: "Vince Stokes" <stokesv@...>
Date: Tue Oct 5, 2004 11:26 am
Subject: Re: Nuts and stow for sea

Gosh, I hadn't heard Rick Gross's name in a long time. Turnover
with him was always such a joy! (Rick, if you are out there, feel
free to retort!).

Ahhhh, food substitutions.....the Chop's nightmare. I remember
having to use ice cream mix near the end of Patrol 53 because we ran
out of powdered eggs - MS1 Kinkaid used them in the pancakes one
morning, they didn't taste too bad. But the one that got me in
trouble with CDR Ward was the day that the wardroom MS reloaded the
captain's jar of Jif (or was it Skippy) peanut butter from one of
those green WW2 surplus cans - you know, the kind where the oil had
separated completely from the peanut butter paste. Obviously the MS
thought that CDR Ward would taste the difference....he found out
otherwise, after I got calibrated.

Just sitting here - a thousand memories come flooding back. Ive got
a story to tell about Pizza Night with XO Papineau, but will hold it
for now. Any good Pizza Night/Half Way night stories out there?

Vince Stokes, Blue Crew Chop, '82-'85

From Yahoo

Aux chow line**

Post by From Yahoo » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:51 pm

From: "Keith Dyer" <dp0ktd@...>
Date: Fri Oct 1, 2004 1:37 pm
Subject: Aux chow line

I too was a Sonar Tech, 89-91 and I know not to much pepperoni made
it down. Hell I think a couple rib eyes ended up out board too.

Keith Dyer
STS1/SS

User avatar
MattBaseflug
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 12:06 am
First Name: Matt
Last Name: Baseflug
Crew?: Blue
Which Years on Board: 1983-88
Special Crew?: Neither
Rate: ET-1
Contact:

Post by MattBaseflug » Thu Dec 01, 2005 12:34 am

I think it was patrol 53 or 55 when we did As and Ds while we headed out
to patrol. Having just finished food load out after refit, I was still
missing a few #10 cans of mixed nuts....funny how they all don't make it
into the food lockers when you had to bring food on board one can at a
time. Well, I was on the dive when we got the 25 down call, and sure
enough, here comes one of the #10 cans of mixed nuts flying out of the
overhead from the ESM bay. NavETs were on the XOs you-know-what list
after that for a few days....and my inventory got a little bit better!

LIES!!!!
Nav ET Div, Blue, 83-87

User avatar
NavCity Smitty
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
First Name: William A. (Bill)
Last Name: Smith
Crew?: Gold
Which Years on Board: 1969-74
Special Crew?: Neither
Rate: ET1(SS)Ret

Angles & Dangles and Coffee Cup Blues

Post by NavCity Smitty » Sun Dec 30, 2007 1:18 am

Without fail, the Nav Center Sup would select his junior watch stander (is mise) to take the coffee cups to the galley just prior to the commencement of As & Ds. You have to understand, the Nav Center can hold a ba-zillion coffee cups, and I would leave there with cups stacked up both arms, walk "uphill" to the aft Ops Compartment ladder, for the first up-angle had already commenced, and then carefully wend my way down the ladder as the angle lessened. I would then make the turn aft, and climb "uphill" again toward the galley to deposit the cups in the scullery. The mess cooks would greet me with open arms, of course (choice words, meat cleavers, whatever) and eventually relieve me of the cups, then wonder why I was taking three clean cups from the stowage rack!

I would, of course, make the return trip to the Nav Center, with three fresh cups of coffee (uphill both ways), having wasted the appropriate amount of time battling with the mess cooks over the returned cups to ensure I would not have an easy go of it.

Somehow, I never caught on that they planned it so that I would be battling the angles with arms full of cups, nor that they were making book on the very minute I would lose the load and/or the odds of my losing the load and/or returning with coffee on my "poopie suit" or in the cups. I think I made someone rich, and a lot of others unhappy, for I never dropped a cup or spilled coffee (unlike me, for usually I'm a clutz!).
Slán agus beannacht
Bill Smith
ET1(SS) Retarded
1969 - 1974
Nav/ET

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot]